#GreaterSeattle: What the hijab really means

Miriam Zeghmi is a Communications and Early Childhood & Family Studies double major at the University of Washington.

Zeghmi is Muslim, and wears a religious head covering, also known as hijab, every day.

In this video, she speaks about her experiences with the hijab and how misconceptions and stigmas associated with it impact her life and the lives around her:

“You don’t see successful Muslim women in the media,” she says. “There’s this narrative that our fathers or our brothers or our husbands are oppressing us and telling us what to do, and because of them we’re wearing this hijab. But if they knew what goes on in Muslim households, they’d really think otherwise.”

“The hijab doesn’t limit you, it doesn’t make you submissive.”


To view the VIDEO project on The Seattle Globalist, click here.

To view the VIDEO PREVIEW on Instagram, click here.

USA First Days with Aaron Wong

To listen to the INTERVIEW on the First Days Project, click here.

To listen to the INTERVIEW on The Seattle Globalist, click here.


In 2003, Aaron Wong, then 38, and his family immigrated to Bothell for the first time. Wong was born and raised in Singapore, where he met his Japanese wife. They lived Singapore and in Japan.

Wong’s employer was a global operation, so it had offices all around the world. The office in Japan required Wong to make frequent business trips to the Washington area annually. Wong, his wife and their young daughter set forth towards Washington together.

After that first move to the U.S., the family spent about two years in the Seattle area, before moving back to Japan for Wong’s job. But in 2007, for the second time, the family — which by then also included a boy — decided to move back to Seattle, in order to enroll their daughter and son in the American education system. The family now lives in Woodinville.